An article about the importance of language in relation to healing practices “Every time we talk about bodies and healing, we are in relationship to histories and beliefs about what is normal and what is not. These histories and beliefs carry invisible assumptions as heavy as gravity.”

1hr25mins Video (no subtitles) “This was a webinar conversation with adrienne maree brown, joined by fellow generative somatics (gs) teachers, Jonathan Stith, Mei-ying Williams, and Staci K. Haines”

14-25th oct 2020. A place for learning, sharing and building community around embodiment. Register to watch live for free, there is a fee for recordings.

An essay that asks what is a politicised somatics and talks about what somatics is and is not.

This piece by Nicole Bindler for Contact Quarterly makes a case for a more politicized contact improvisation community, specifically around the issue of Palestine/Israel.

In this blog post for the Somatics Toolkit, Nicole Bindler discusses three topics derived from her lecture “Embodied Palestine Solidarity” that refer to ways that dance practices in the region reflect and sometimes perpetuate the Israeli occupation of Palestinian land through cultural appropriation, cultural erasure, and whitewashing.

This audio recording for the Somatics Toolkit shares a practice created by Nicole Bindler that explores the development of the gonads, which are embryonic, unsexed ovaries, testis, or nonbinary variations. Through sensing or imagining our undifferentiated embryonic origins, and potential variations in our adult bodies, we can explore an underlying biological explanation for sex and gender fluidity, broaden and complexify our understanding of human sex and gender expression, and repattern any fixed, binary notions of sex and gender that we hold in our bodies or minds.

Sarah Mann-O’donnell reflects in her blog on her experience participating in a Clitoral Embodiment workshop with Nicole Bindler, “…my experience of her clitoral embodiment work was quite simply that of a gentle revolution. I use this term to try to capture the nexus of affirmation, challenge, respect, attention to social justice, and qualitative change through innovation that she offers.

This podcast is for all of us queerly bodied people. Sometimes it feels like there is a constricting demand on our bodies, that we must look or feel or experience pleasure in a certain way.

Mia Mingus’ 2011 essay coining and describing the term access intimacy “Access intimacy is that elusive, hard to describe feeling when someone else “gets” your access needs.”